Updated September 24, 2020

The statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4213) passed by the Oregon State Legislature on June 26, 2020, will expire on September 30, 2020. In order to ensure Multnomah County renters can continue relying on the same residential tenant protections as long as the COVID-19 pandemic persists, the Board of County Commissioners adopted Ordinance No. 1287 on September 24, 2020. The ordinance preserves protections in the statewide eviction moratorium for Multnomah County renters through at least January 8, 2021.

Find more information about the moratorium below.

Can't pay rent?

If you are a tenant in Oregon unable to pay your rent, you can't be evicted for nonpayment during the moratorium. You do not have to provide proof that you can’t pay.

Tenants will have a six-month repayment grace period, which begins the day after the moratorium is lifted, to pay back rent from the moratorium period. During the repayment grace period, tenants will be required to pay their current rent as it comes due, in addition to any back rent they may owe.

If you rent your home

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  • The moratorium protects any renter unable to pay rent from being evicted until at least Jan. 8, 2021.
  • The moratorium also protects any renter from being evicted without cause until at least Jan. 8, 2021.
  • It does not protect residential tenants evicted for any other lawful purpose, but a landlord must inform their tenant of the reason for the eviction.
     

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  • If you are able to pay rent when it’s due, you should pay your rent.
     

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  • You do not have to provide proof of income loss to your landlord.
  • Save all documentation, however, so you can qualify for any possible state or federal rent assistance programs.
     

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  • The repayment grace period starts after the moratorium is lifted. You will have six months to pay back rent from the moratorium period.
  • During the repayment grace period, you will be required to pay your current rent as it comes due, in addition to any back rent you may owe.
     

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  • Landlords who violate any part of the eviction moratorium law can be sued by the tenant for an amount up to three times the monthly rent.
  • Seek legal advice or support from community resources like the Community Alliance of Tenants or Legal Aid Services of Oregon if your landlord threatens to evict you, applies late fees, or you need more guidance.
  • Landlords and their residential tenants can enter into payment plans if both parties are willing. There is no legal requirement to enter into a payment plan.