white van

Syringe exchange and disposal is an evidence-based public health program designed to reduce the spread of HIV, hepatitis C and other blood-borne infections among people who inject drugs, their families and the larger community.

Services include:

  • New, sterile syringes in exchange for used ones
  • Wound care
  • Safer sex supplies

We routinely offer risk reduction counseling and referrals to medical care, housing, STD treatment, mental health counseling and alcohol and drug treatment.

Ask for Free Naloxone

Naloxone, commonly known as Narcan, is a drug used to reverse the effects of an opiate overdose. Overdose rescue kits containing naloxone are FREE for exchange clients at all of our needle exchange sites. Arrive early for training.


Needle Exchange Schedule

Monday

11am-7pm | Harm Reduction Clinic, 12425 NE Glisan St (in the Menlo Park Plaza, behind Walgreens)

12-5pm | *Outside In, 1219 SW Main St

3-6pm | Clark County in Vancouver, WA, 3701 E Fourth Plain Blvd

Tuesday

12-5pm | *Outside In, 1219 SW Main St

7-9pm | SE 82nd Ave and Ash St, one block off Burnside – in the white van

Wednesday

12-5pm | *Outside In, 1219 SW Main St

3-5pm | SE 190th Ave, between Division St & Yamhill St— in the white van

3-6 pm | Clark County in Vancouver, WA, 3701 E Fourth Plain Blvd

Thursday

11am-7pm | Harm Reduction Clinic, 12425 NE Glisan St (in Menlo Park Plaza, behind Walgreens)

12-5pm | *Outside In, 1219 SW Main St

2-5pm | *Clackamas Service Center, 8800 SE 80th (off 82nd Ave & Cornwell)

Friday

12-5pm | *Outside In, 1219 SW Main St

2-5 pm | Clark County in Vancouver, WA, 3701 E Fourth Plain Blvd

7-9pm | SE 82nd Ave and Ash St, one block off Burnside – in the white van

Saturday

2-5pm | **Portland People's Outreach Project (PPOP), Anarres Infoshop, 7101 N Lombard St

Good to Know

  • Outside In & Clackamas Service Center exchange up to 50 needles per day.
  • Portland People's Outreach Project is an all-volunteer group, run by and for injection drug users.

drawing of a sore on a forearm

How to Get Abscess Care

Get your referral from any needle exchange staff. Then go to one of the following:

Outside In Medical Clinic
1132 SW 13th Ave (MAP)
503-535-3800
Hours and more info»

Harm Reduction Clinic
12425 NE Glisan St (NE 122nd Ave & Glisan St) (MAP)
503-988-0577
Hours: Monday and Thursday, 11am - 7pm. Last client seen at 6pm.

Oregon’s Good Samaritan Overdose Law

If someone is overdosing in Oregon and you seek medical help, neither of you can be arrested or prosecuted for:

  1. Possessing drugs or drug paraphernalia
  2. Being in a place where drugs are used
  3. Violating probation or parole because of #1 or #2
  4. Outstanding warrants related to #1 or #2

sketch of a rotary phone handset

Helpful Numbers

  • If someone has overdosed, call 911
  • NEX Info English | 503-280-1611 - for hours and holiday closures
  • NEX Info Spanish | 503-988-6333
  • STD Clinic | 503-988-3700
  • Alcohol & Drug Helpline |1-800-923-HELP
  • Outside In IDU Health Services | 503-535-3826
  • Clark County Syringe Exchange | 360-750-8610 when open, 360-397-8086 after hours
 

FAQs about Syringe Exchange

Is syringe exchange legal?

In Oregon, it is legal for a person over 18 years of age to purchase syringes without a prescription. Hypodermic syringes and needles are exempted from the Oregon drug paraphernalia law (ORS.475.525).

Why do we need syringe exchange in Multnomah County?

Drug use is a significant problem in our community with many negative consequences to individuals, families, and neighborhoods. In Multnomah County, injection drug use is one of the leading causes of HIV infection. Not only is the person injecting drugs at risk of HIV infection, but his or her sexual partners and unborn children may also be at risk.

Public health efforts to reach out with syringe exchange services to those who may not be able or willing to stop injecting drugs is one part of the solution. Our primary mission is to prevent the spread of blood-borne infections such as HIV and hepatitis C. Many government agencies and community-based organizations have recommended that one-time-only use of sterile syringes is an important strategy to reduce the spread of HIV, hepatitis C and other blood-borne infections. Some of these organizations include: the U.S. Public Health Service, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Prevention Services Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Research Council, the National Commission on AIDS, the American Medical Association, and many others.

Do syringe exchange programs increase the amount of drug use?

In 1997, an independent panel assembled by the National Institute of Health issued a report stating that exchange services do not increase needle injecting behavior among current users, nor was it found to encourage people to start injecting drugs. In fact, syringe exchange has become a gateway for substance abuse treatment readiness and referral. In Tacoma, Washington, the syringe exchange program is the single largest source of treatment referrals in the entire county.

Does syringe exchange work?

Multiple studies have compared cities that have low rates of HIV infection among people who inject drugs with cities that have high rates of HIV infection among people who inject drugs. These studies found that the cities with low rates had started syringe exchange and prevention efforts early in the AIDS epidemic.

Economic studies examining the costs associated with HIV infection have found that the cost per HIV infection prevented by syringe exchange runs about $4,000 to $12,000—considerably less than the estimated $400,000 lifetime medical costs of treating a person who is infected.